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Club Crozer Gives Students Interactive Healthcare Learning Experience

In Brief

  • Club Crozer will host its third annual summer workshop program for Chester High School students in July. Sponsored by the Chester Education Foundation, this unique experience provides students with insight into the healthcare industry and the opportunity to earn First Aid and CPR certifications.
  • The workshop exposes area youth to career opportunities through the Crozer-Keystone Health System. For four days, participants engage in various activities to build leadership and teamwork skills as well as training programs for dietary and First Aid/CPR certification.
  • Club Crozer has been so successful that the program’s leaders have started a program for students who attend the Smedley High School for Healthcareers in Chester. The school program meets every Wednesday and works with students to develop character, skills and career opportunities in the field of healthcare.

Students and counselors from last year's Club Crozer. 

Club Crozer will host its third annual summer workshop program for Chester High School students in July. Sponsored by the Chester Education Foundation, this unique experience provides students with insight into the healthcare industry and the opportunity to earn First Aid and CPR certifications. 

The week-long workshop exposes area youth to career opportunities through the Crozer-Keystone Health System. For four days, participants engage in various activities to build leadership and teamwork skills as well as training programs for dietary and First Aid/ CPR certification. Students work together in teams during emergency medicine training games, critical thinking challenges, fire safety training and medical career insights. Professional medical personnel provide guidance and instruction through patient care simulation.

Attendees at Club Crozer also learn about food safety and nutrition. Campers alternate preparing and providing lunch for team members and guests, showing the importance of nutrition in high quality patient care.

“Students are trained and certified in AHA (American Heart Association) First Aid and CPR for Healthcare Providers. Representatives make presentations from allied health departments such as Clinical Neurophysiology, Respiratory, Ultrasound, Physical Therapy, Nutrition, Laboratory and Social Services. Nursing and the Shock Trauma Unit also present to the group,” says Bill Richard, lead instructor of EMS training at Crozer-Chester Medical Center. “These presentations give the attendees some idea of various careers and, in turn, give them a more focused decision regarding what departments to shadow while they are here.”

The final day of the workshop concludes with a graduation ceremony where participants receive certificates in First Aid and CPR. The students do not have to pay to attend this program. “When I initially met with the group of kids at Chester High School, I questioned them about what career dreams they had. Many students are shocked that it is possible for them to be a paramedic. This is what we are trying to accomplish, a sense of career knowledge, introductory experience, and a clear avenue to get there,” Richard says.

High school senior and certified EMT Becca Scoloff volunteered at Club Crozer this past summer to teach basic EMT skills to students. She wrote an essay for school about her experience. She came with a preconceived idea of what to expect and left with a better understanding of the community and other people.

“My greatest and most terrible fear in life is totally irrational and silly, but really, I am terribly shy and don’t like to have contact with people unless I have to. If they are a long-time friend or family, I can manage but socializing with strangers paralyzes me. I owe it to my experience at Club Crozer for helping me to overcome many of my fears of meeting new people,” Scoloff says.

Scoloff’s neighbor is a paramedic who inspired her to become a certified EMT. Last summer, her neighbor asked her to volunteer to teach other students various EMT skills. Although she agreed, she was very nervous to teach her peers and was afraid that they would judge her or not listen to what she had to teach. Scoloff was also nervous because she was afraid that students would be rude to her because they did not know her. Her fears were quickly diminished as she met her first student, Taiwana. “Without exaggerating, I have never met a friendlier, more outgoing individual in my life. By the time everyone arrived at 7:30 a.m., there were a grand total of 30 campers, six counselors and me,” Scoloff says.

Reflecting more on the first day, she says, “After breaking up into six groups of five, the company went outside to a picnic area to learn how to take a blood pressure. After a few moments of awkward hovering, I took a seat at the picnic bench with my group. As the lead instructor handed out stethoscopes and blood pressure cuffs, she explained and demonstrated the proper use and technique of each device. I admired the confident force with which she expertly commanded her pupils. Then it was my turn to help instruct as the group practiced on each other. At first, I was unsure of myself and uncomfortable with telling people what to do, but as time went on it became easier and more natural.

“It quickly became apparent that I do not mask my crippling shyness very well because I was frequently asked, ‘You are really shy, aren’t you, Becca?’ Every time, I bashfully responded, ‘I don’t know. Yeah, I guess I am.’ I even began talking to some of the kids, and I found most of them to be very interesting, genuine people. As we became more acquainted, they revealed tidbits of their lives. I hadn’t realized how inspiring their own lives were until I listened to their stories. I received a major culture shock just a 10-minute drive from my comfortable suburban middle-class existence. This whole experience has taught me that there is really nothing to fear in meeting new people. They might even be as intimidated as I am. I walked away from this a more confident and empathetic person eager for new adventures.”

The summer program has been so successful that Richard and his team have started a program for students who attend the Smedley High School for Healthcareers in Chester. The school program meets every Wednesday and works with students to develop character, skills and career opportunities in the field of health. Approximately 16-20 students meet each Wednesday throughout the school year.

The Wednesday program opens up opportunities for technicians, residents and EMS personnel to volunteer their time to mentor students and answer their questions about going into the health industry. “Not only are the students learning a lot, but those who volunteer are also getting a lot from the experience,” Richard says. “Club Crozer has  been a great experience for everyone involved and we are grateful for the support." 

If you are interested in learning more about the program, call (610) 447-6181 or e-mail club.crozer@crozer.org.

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