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Published on January 15, 2013

Men: You Have a 50/50 Chance Of Getting Cancer

Well, that’s not anyone’s favorite headline, now is it?

Researchers in the United Kingdom say that by the year 2027, half of all men in the UK will have been diagnosed with cancer, meaning ostensibly that men living today have a 50/50 shot of contracting some form of cancer.

That’s the bad news.

The good news is that a primary reason the numbers are rising is because people are living longer. And the even better news is that more men will survive cancer in the future because of advancements in both screening for the disease and in treatments.

The cancers in men that are set to increase the most are bowel, prostate, and skin cancers.

Of course, being on the right side of the survival rates requires being screened and getting treatments when needed, something that a lot of men tend to procrastinate over. 

And, as a for instance, men are more likely than women to be affected with bowel cancer, but fewer men get screened for the disease. This gap needs to close in order for survival rates to keep pace with the anticipated increase in the number of cancer patients.

Continuing education will be critical to ensure that men seek medical help early in any potential cancer cycle; plenty of studies have shown that early detection is an extremely important aspect of surviving cancer. If half of all men are going to get cancer in their lifetime, catching it early is extremely important.

Better yet, most medical professionals believe that adopting a healthy lifestyle reduces a person’s cancer risk. Limiting alcohol and quitting smoking, eating healthy and exercising regularly are smart behaviors that can head off cancer, especially for people who have a genetic predisposition to the disease. Experts estimate that about forty percent of cancer cases could be prevented simply by living a healthier lifestyle.

The odds of contracting cancer are increasing, and that’s bad. But making healthier choices day-in and day-out are a way to combat those odds.
For more information about Crozer-Keystone Health System Cancer Services, visit http://ckcancer.crozerkeystone.org.

You can also call 1-866-695-HOPE (4673) to request an appointment with a physician who cares for cancer patients.

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