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Published on November 29, 2012

Road to Recovery Program to Assist Cancer Patients Seeks Volunteers in Delaware County

 

Every year, thousands of people are diagnosed with cancer. Whether it’s a friend, relative, loved one, or even yourself, we have all been touched by cancer in some way. Luckily, most of us have the means to drive ourselves or loved ones to life-saving cancer treatments and appointments. Unfortunately, due to the expensive care and treatment for cancer services, some patients in our community are unable to drive to those life-saving appointments.

The biggest obstacle cancer patients in Delaware County face is getting to their treatments. Patients are either too ill to drive themselves due to chemotherapy or cannot afford transportation. By donating your time and support, you can now help cancer patients in Delaware County get to their lifesaving treatments by becoming a Road to Recovery volunteer driver.

With the increased need of transportation, the American Cancer Society (ACS) has created the Road to Recovery program to provide free transportation to those who are unable to drive to their cancer appointments for various reasons. The program is made possible by the generous volunteers who donate their time to help cancer patients in their community. But without volunteers, the program is not able to function.

To become a Road to Recovery volunteer driver, you only need to volunteer one day a week, or even one afternoon a month to drive a local cancer patient to their appointments at Crozer-Keystone Health System facilities.

Other qualifications to become a Road to Recovery volunteer driver include:

  • A safe driver possessing valid driver’s license, insurance and car in good condition
  • Emotionally stable, friendly, and compassionate
  • Sensitive to the patient and therefore tactful in both attitude and conversation
  • Respectful of the patient’s right to full confidentiality
  • Cooperative with other American Cancer Society volunteers and staff
  • Reliable in following through on all commitments.

Road to Recovery volunteer drivers will also need to complete an initial training session, provided by the American Cancer Society, before driving cancer patients to their appointments. Driver coordinators will match volunteer drivers with local patients based on their schedule.

“Even though we have seen remarkable progress in the fight against cancer, there are still challenges cancer patients face every day, such as getting to their lifesaving appointments,” says Marie DeStefano, R.N., administrative director of Oncology for Crozer-Keystone. “By simply donating your time and support to becoming a Road to Recovery volunteer driver you can help someone with cancer live a fuller, longer life.”

Volunteers can donate their time whenever they are available.

DeStefano adds, “The Road to Recovery is an excellent program that helps all cancer patients get the care they need. Having the program in DelawareCounty can have a tremendous impact on the lives of cancer patients in this area. They will be able to get to their appointments with ease of mind.”

Facing cancer is a major challenge, but not having to worry about how to get to cancer treatments and appointments is one less stressor patients have to worry about in their road to recovery.

For more information about how to become a Road to Recovery volunteer or about American Cancer Society services, please contact Kimberly Brydges, Health Initiatives Representative, at 1-888-202-1487 ext. 65135 or kimberly.brydges@cancer.org

The American Cancer Society combines an unyielding passion with nearly a century of experience to save lives and end cancer for good. As a global grassroots force of three million volunteers, we fight for every birthday threatened by every cancer in every community. We save lives by helping you stay well by preventing cancer or detecting it early, helping you get well by being there for you during and after a diagnosis, by finding cures through groundbreaking discovery and fighting back through public policy. As the nation’s largest non-governmental investor in cancer research, contributing more than $3.8 billion, we turn what we know about cancer into what we do. As a result, more than 11 million people in America who have had cancer and countless more who have avoided it will be celebrating birthdays this year. To learn more about us or to get help, call us anytime, day or night, at 1-800-227-2345 or visit www.cancer.org.

For more information about cancer services at Crozer-Keystone Health System, visit http://ckcancer.crozer.org. To request an appointment with a cancer specialist affiliated with Crozer-Keystone, call 1-866-695-HOPE (1-866-695-4673).

 

 

 

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