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Published on April 03, 2012

Research Program Equips Families to Respond to Cardiac Arrest

In Brief

  • Crozer-Chester Medical Center is participating in a new research study sponsored by the Center for Resuscitation Science at the University of Pennsylvania.
  • The study aims to help friends and families of patients with known cardiac conditions learn cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).
  • Family members of CPR Anytime is a take-home education kit that includes a personal inflatable manikin and instructional DVD that provides users with a hands-on opportunity to practice CPR
  • As part of the study, Crozer will provide kits to family members of patients in the medical center’s intensive care units.

 

research program cardiac arrest

This take-home kit aims to help
friends and families of patients with
known cardiac arrest conditions learn
learn cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crozer-Chester Medical Center is participating in a new, hospital-initiated research study, sponsored by the Center for Resuscitation Science at the University of Pennsylvania, which aims to help friends and families of patients with known cardiac conditions learn cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

According to the American Heart Association, over 300,000 Americans suffer from sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) every year, and less than 8 percent of those victims who suffer from cardiac arrest outside a hospital survive. Approximately 80 percent of all out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur in the victim’s home, so the friends and family members of at-risk individuals need to be educated on and prepared for what to do in that situation.

CPR can double a cardiac arrest victim’s chances of survival if it is administered immediately and effectively. However, less than one-third of out-of-hospital victims receive CPR from a witness. This is due mostly to the widespread lack of accessibility to CPR education and/or training programs. CPR training programs are costly (more than $100), time-consuming (3-4 hours) and require the presence of a CPR-certified instructor. Additionally, most CPR programs are offered in the workplace or at schools to younger crowds. Since cases of sudden cardiac arrest happen in the home, witnesses are usually the spouse or similarly-aged friend/family member of the victim.

In response to these CPR education dissemination obstacles, the American Heart Association developed the 25-minute program, “CPR Anytime.” CPR Anytime is a take-home kit that includes a personal inflatable manikin and instructional DVD that provides users with a hands-on opportunity to practice CPR. Furthermore, research has shown that people who use CPR Anytime perform just as well as individuals who have taken a traditional CPR course.

With these CPR kits, the Center for Resuscitation Science developed the CPR Anytime Hospital-Initiated Program (CHIP) research study. The goal of CHIP is to use hospitals as a unique “point of capture” to access at-risk families and empower them with the life-saving abilities of CPR. Furthermore, CHIP seeks to develop a more sustainable CPR training model by utilizing hospital resources, such as nurses and volunteers, who can act as CPR Anytime instructors and distributors.

As part of the study, Crozer will provide kits to family members of patients in the medical center’s intensive care units.

Crozer joined the ranks of several other hospitals in Pennsylvania and New Jersey in this initiative. Angel McCullough, R.N., MBA, NEA-BC, CCRN, nurse director of the Cardiovascular Unit, Medical Intensive Care Unit and Telemetry Unit at Crozer, is leading the CPR Anytime Program along with Elizabeth McGowan, B.S.N., shift manager.

“At Crozer-Chester Medical Center, we practice nursing in a manner that is centered on the patient and his or her family,” McCullough says. “With the CPR Anytime Program, we are able to empower at-risk families with the life-saving tool of CPR.”

Using this 25-minute program, nurses can provide CPR training anywhere there is enough space  such as in a patient’s room, a nearby family waiting room or even a conference room. To be eligible for CPR training, participants must be between 18 and 80 years of age, be able to kneel and practice CPR for 25 minutes and have an at-risk friend or family member at Crozer.

For more information about the CPR Anytime Program at Crozer-Chester Medical Center, please contact McCullough at (610) 447-6437.

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